Archive for March, 2009

Mar 30 2009

The Auteurs

Published by under Community,Movies

The Auteurs

Criterion launches a social network for film geeks.  One of the best implementations I've seen.  Forums, reviews, friends, pay per view.

I like niche communities -- a lot -- and I like them seperate and not under a big tent like Facebook. Reel-Time for saltwater fly fishing. The Auteurs for art films. Chowhound for food. I know there have been an attempt or two at a rowing network -- but it fell flat for me.

Anyway, I'm dying to figure out the engine under Auteurs. It's a nice piece of code.

2 responses so far

Mar 30 2009

Jury duty – a good thing

Published by under General

This morning, for the first time in my life I was impaneled on a jury, heard a trial, and rendered a verdict. This was perhaps the fifth time I've been called, the first time I've been selected.

The details of the case are inconsequential and I take the confidentiality of the jury room very seriously after today's experience. What was interesting was the overwhelming sense of responsibility I felt to listen harder than I had ever listened before, to pay attention to the judge's instructions, to separate fact from hearsay, and "discharge my duty" to the best of my abilities. The instructions were emphatically clear – was there a contract between the two parties? We weren't to decide what was "fair" or what the "equity" between the two parties should be – that wasn't the issue. The issue was simple: was there a contract or an agreement between the two parties?

I've followed trials as a reporter but the experience of sitting in a chair a few feet away from the defendant and the plaintiff, locking eyes with them because in the end we're the only people in the room that matter, hearing their sad story (happy stories don't go to Falmouth District Court on a Monday in March), was powerful and lot more engaging than scribbling shorthand notes in a steno pad in the back row thinking about lunch.

The dynamics of the jury during the deliberation was amazing. No straw vote kicked things off; the juror video made it clear that was not a smart idea. Instead there was a quick, frank, discussion where everyone listened respectfully to everybody else. I made a single point that the question had been set out by the judge, said everything else was extraneous to that question, and then listened as people complained about their lack of power in determining what was fair. We voted. We were unanimous. We returned to the courtroom, delivered our verdict, and five minutes later were saying goodbye to each other in the parking lot. Fair/unfair, right/wrong – it was pretty cool and I drove away feeling super-civic and pretty happy to be a citizen of a country where a jury of one's peers is a fundamental right.

Oh, and the judge cracked me up when he said, "I don't want to see any blackberries googling or twittering in my court or in the jury room. I've never googled anything in my life except for a few good looking dames."

 

One response so far

Mar 28 2009

William Madison Wood

Published by under Cape Cod

I went down a sidepath of digression while researching the history of the Elizabeth Islands and came across the Wikipedia entry for Cuttyhunk Island, the last of the chain and a very fishy place with a famous striped bass fishing club (which I have never visited, but hope to).

For that matter I have never set foot on Cuttyhunk, but also hope to. Anyway, while researching the history of Cuttyhunk I learned that the old bass club had once been purchased by one William Wood. His story is fascinating, and personally interesting because my life intersects his at a few common points. It's one of the classic rags-to-riches stereotypes.

William Madison Wood Jr. was the son of Portuguese immigrants. He was born at home on Pease Point Road in Edgartown, on Martha's Vineyard, in 1858 – about the time of my great-great-grandfather's last voyage from Edgartown as master of the whaling ship Massachusetts. Wood's father was a whaler, a common occupation for the Portuguese, many of whom joined American whaling ships when they stopped in the Azores for crew and supplies on their way south to the Pacific fishery. He died at sea in 1861, when William Jr. was 12.

Wood found employment in the textile mills of New Bedford. During the Civil War, eastern Massachusetts' textile mills were roaring to keep up with demand for woolen uniforms and blankets, and New Bedford was among one of the most robust textile towns, with the Wamsutta Mills dominating the trade there. Wood served his apprenticeship under a wealthy mill owner, Andrew Pierce, and rose rapidly because of his work ethic. He left New Bedford at the age of 18, moved to Philadelphia, found a job at a brokerage firm, and learned finance to the point that he returned to New Bedford and a job at a bank.

Wood made his fortune in Lawrence, Massachusetts where I was a newspaper reporter in the early 1980s. A hundred years before, the massive Washington Mill went bankrupt and was purchased by Frederick Ayer of Lowell, Mass. – Wood was hired and quickly rose through management, making about $25,000, a fortune for the the time. Wood's smartest career move was marrying Ayer's daughter.

Wood's achievement was to consolidate a number of independent woolen mills into one massive trust, the American Woolen Company. He was no friend to labor, and was at the center of some controversial strikes after the turn of the century, including a trial for allegedly paying saboteurs to plant explosives in his own mills. These mills are pretty remarkable structures – massive brick buildings that run literally for a mile along the banks of the Merrimack River.

Anyway … third point of intersection for me and Wood was Shawsheen, Massachusetts, a village on the north side of Andover (the town where I grew up). Wood based his corporate offices for the American Woolen Company in Shawsheen, building a massive office building at the main intersection. When I was a newspaper reporter I rented a one-bedroom apartment in that building which had been converted into condos in the late 1970s.

Wood purchased the bass club on Cuttyhunk for his family and sold lots around the buildings to friends so his children would have some summer friends. That club is famous for being one of the most exclusive sporting organizations in the United States, formed in the 1860s by some New York financiers who used carrier pigeons to get reports from the stock markets, and who fished for striped bass from wooden causeways built on iron scaffolds drilled into the granite rocky shore. I would argue that Wood's choice of summer retreats has to rank as one of the best in the world.

Wood suffered a stroke in 1924, moved to Florida in 1926, and a month after retiring went for a ride with his chauffeur. He asked the driver to pull over, got out, walked into the woods, and shot himself with a revolver.

7 responses so far

Mar 28 2009

Digital Governance in a Global Org

I spent part of past Wednesday at the the New York Googleplex with some fellow digital marketers and  agency people as part of Google's Global Advisory Council.  I consider the content and conversations as unbloggable/off-the-record, but wanted to share  one excellent line from Scott McLaren at General Motors, who in the course of presenting how GM was able to centralize search marketing said:

"Centralize the science and localize the art."

That brilliant insight goes into my collection of business koans along with McKinsey's Dick Foster's line:  "Loosen control without losing control" and that anonymous jazzman who told another musician "If you don't know what to do, then don't do anything."

What Scott summarized in that one-liner, is probably familiar to anyone in a global digital marketing role who has tried to evangelize a unified (credit to Carol Kruse at Coca-Cola for recommending "unified" over "centralized") approach to planning, spending and executing a marketing discipline across many oceans and borders.

Decentralization is the rule in a massive global organization, a throw-back to the Roman Empire when the edges of the empire were too far away from the center of power in Rome and the Emperor had to divide c0ntrol between four Caesars. When I was at International Data Group in 2005 I felt the 1970s edict by owner and founder Pat McGovern that decentralization was the way the company would be organized and run was out of date and a worn out necessity born from a pre-fax/pre-email era, one that ignored the economies of scale of consolidating 300 websites onto a unified analytics and content management system.

Information Technology tends to consolidate and unify. The oldest story in the IT playbook is the hub, the router, the server, the data center.  All discussions of mesh architectures and complex matrixed "edge" computing models have been speculative structures, but in the end, the men in white coats want the users to be on dumb diskless workstations, working in unity off of one central processor. But - IT aside -- money likes to be decentralized. If you want "feet on the street" to take accountability for sales targets, then you have to push fiscal responsibility down to the regional and country level -- otherwise there will be no accountability or insights into local markets.

Back to McLaren's statement and why I think search engine marketing must be centralized.

  • The auction model punishes organizations that have two or more people bidding on the same brand terms.  This is classic Three Stooges behavior. Search bids are science. Not art.
  • Analytical conformity. What's the dashboard by which activities are going to be measured? How do you value search interactions and analyze search against other media in market? Can you compare the effects of a television campaign to searches? The answer is yes .... if you have a well controlled environment and are reasonably assured that your results are not being skewed by dealers, channel partners, or affiliates bidding on your branded terms against you. Analytics are science -- not art.
  • Expertise. Most, if not all major search budgets are managed by search speciality agencies. They have to.  Search campaigns are complex, rigorous organisms that require deep, repeatable expertise. An agency accustomed to running complex global search for multiple clients will generally beat the efforts of a single internal operator or team of search operators. Dispersing SEM expertise regionally makes utterly no sense.

What else can be centralized in global digital marketing?

  • Display advertising, for the most part, can be negotiated, bought, trafficked, executed and measured centrally.
  • Display advertising should have a 15 or 20% set aside for local sites and local trafficking. There is art to display media plans, and local teams have the best insight into what local sites have local readership. That said -- supporting many countries with many display media agencies is insane as non-working dollars explode and working dollars decline.

What can't be centralized?

  • Display creative needs to be locally verified. Holiday promotions tend to drive ecommerce discounting and only a local team can declare St. Patrick's Day over Golden Week.
  • Social media relations. Bloggers, forums, high profile users -- all should be related to on a local, face to face basis. Local meetups and in-person relations are vital to any community efforts.

More later, but it was good to hear two very global, very capable marketers confirm the issues I've seen the past three years.  Digital marketing needs to be unified around IT, analytics, and discounted volume negotiations but localized around creative and customer/blogger relations.

One response so far

Mar 28 2009

Blew it (whereabouts)

Published by under General

Packing for Beijing this morning I check for my passport, thumb through to find the visa. Expired. I am an idiot. Trip cancelled.

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Mar 26 2009

Getting to know one’s septum

Published by under WTF?

Okay, I won't talk about the last month's nasal experience. Let's just say the septoplasty thing is pretty much over -- I still don't have any feeling in the tip of my nose, aliens come out of my nostrils every morning, and the black eyes have sort of faded away.  I would not recommend contracting a cold in the week following a nose job. No.

Anyway, in nasal distress, I decided to buy a "neti pot" -- a teapot one sticks in one's nose and then pours saline solution into one's nasal cavity, which floods and drains out the opposite nostril. Very holistic. Just the ticket. It sort of works. It sort of doesn't. Well, it mostly doesn't, but it does loosen up the aforementioned "aliens" and produces some jetsam that brings to mind ancient honeycombs.

Then I found this wonderful demonstration of what to do and what not to do courtesy of toothpastefordinner.com

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4 responses so far

Mar 24 2009

Technology | ExecTweets

Technology | ExecTweets.

Twitter, Federated Media and Microsoft have launched an interesting aggregator of business people who use Twitter. I'll play with it for a while -- many of the people listed are already in Tweet Deck, but ExecTweets acts as a squelch knob, surfacing the exec level noise above the few hundred people I follow elsewhere. Not sure if a web-aggregator makes sense as I tend to like a client like Twhirl of Tweetdeck minimized and available.

update: I looked at my Twitter page and saw my first twitter-ad, courtesy of Federated calling attention to ExecTweets. Federated struck again today with a Marchmadness app for AT&T.

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Mar 22 2009

Whereabouts week of 3/23

Published by under General

Monday-Wednesday - NYC
Thursday-Saturday - Cotuit
Sunday - Beijing

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Mar 20 2009

What I’m watching: Satantango

Published by under General,Movies

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One of the benefits of a son attending NYU's Tisch School of Cinema Studies is you get an introduction to cinema that the local Cineplex can't deliver, and a critic-on-the-couch to give an amazing introduction to what is happening on the screen.  As faithful readers know, I've been entertaining myself this winter with the amazing Criterion Art House collection -- 50  films from around the world. This past week my son was home for a few days on spring break. He brought with him a Hungarian film released in 1996, but only released on DVD a year ago -- Satantango -- a 7-hour epic by Bela Tarr.

That's right. Seven-hour hours. Three DVDs.

Plot:  The final days of a Hungarian communist-era collective farm. I guess late 198os, early 1990s. The "savior" of the farmers, Irimias, is coming, but the farmers, living in utter mud and squalor, think of leaving with what cash they have. Ten minute static shots. Moody music. Chapters revealing one character after another. At first the whole thing has the feeling of Valve's Half-Life 2 video game and the viewer feels like Gordon Freeman, a visitor to an unfortunate black and white Iron Curtain hell of crumbling plaster, leaking roofs, and incessant rains.

From there -- well, no way I am blogging a synopsis of a seven-hour flick. Let's just say you get into the groove, you take lots of breaks, every now and then you say, "Whoa" and every now and then you nod off. The late critic, filmmaker and novelist, Susan Sontag said, ""Devastating, enthralling for every minute of its seven hours. I'd be glad to see it every year for the rest of my life."

You can see some clips on YouTube. The opening eight minutes of cows is pretty good. The actual tango scene (I want the accordion music as the ringtone on my new BlackBerry -- single most annoying and infectious piece of music ever) is worth a few minutes.

The movie is controversial due to a horrific scene involving a cat (which Tarr swears was unharmed and became his pet). It was pretty rough.

So -- I suspect I am like one of a few thousand people to see this. I'd recommend it if you are really into art film. This isn't a marathon stunt like some of Andy Warhol's weirdness -- 12 hours of the Empire State building. But it is a long committment best savored over a few days. Good luck finding it.

One response so far

Mar 20 2009

Microsoft video – actually humorous

Published by under General

My heart be still. The very end, the Ninja, made me laugh.

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4 responses so far

Mar 20 2009

Annals of usability: you suck at searching

Published by under WTF?

On the Southpark website today, while searching for a dimly remembered episode, I failed and received this encouragement

2 responses so far

Mar 20 2009

Fujitsu Launches E-Reader

Published by under Books

Color Me Flepia: Fujitsu Launches E-Reader

Thanks to Lisa Sonntag for pointing out Fujitsu's launch of a color e-book reader. Pretty pricey.

"For those who don't read Playboy for the articles, Fujitsu has an e-book for you. Dubbed the Flepia, the device is what the company calls the world's first color e-book -- it can display 260,000 colors. Quite a difference from Amazon.com's Kindle black and white e-book, which retails for $359.

Various documents and images -- from books, newspapers, magazines and the Internet -- can be seen on an 8-inch touch screen in high definition -- 768 x 1,014.

The Flepia goes on sale on April 20 -- in Japan only -- and will be available through Fujitsu Frontech's online store. The price tag? A whopping $1,000. Hmm, maybe things don't look worse in black and white."

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Mar 19 2009

Scenes from the recession

Published by under General

Scenes from the recession - The Big Picture - Boston.com.

An amazingly depressing set of photos. Thx to Fester for the pointer.

This says it all for the state of the American newspaper.

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Mar 19 2009

Think Ahead While Cutting Back: Marketing Priorities in a Recession : MarketingProfs

Published by under Dour Marketer

via Think Ahead While Cutting Back: Marketing Priorities in a Recession : MarketingProfs Articles.

The Dour Marketer just caught a tweet from MarketingProfs' Ann Handley pointing to this free piece by some smart people at MarketingNPV (disclosure, which has quoted me in a white paper penned by former colleague Rob O'Regan on marketing ROI in the past).

This is really good, n0-nonsense advice on how to cut when the mandate comes down from on high, and what not to cut during our current Depressionary pothole. There's been a lot of this advice slung around recently, with rainbows-and-unicorns advice about "don't stop the authentic conversation," this sounds more like the real deal:

"First, get your head out of the emotional sand. You've lost the battle over the power of Marketing to drive the business in the near term. Don't let disappointment cloud your future. Suck it up, look ahead, and don't take it personally.

Second, take a step back and define the objectives for making smart cuts:

  • Achieve the target reductions the CEO is asking for (most people stop right here).
  • Support the company strategy for competing successfully.
  • Conduct a thorough and unbiased analysis of all options.
  • Preserve your credibility. Live to fight again another day."

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Mar 19 2009

Are e-books hitting the tipping point?

Published by under Books

Take the recent announcement of the Kindle 2 by Amazon, last holiday's shortages of the first generation device following Oprah's endorsement; mix in Google's immense effort to digitize the world's library of copyright-expired books; throw in a ton of OEM interest in eInk and other e-reader screen technologies; blend in a bad economy and the simple math that e-books are half the price of their tree-killing, backpack straining ancestors; add a little something called the iPhone and an Amazon app that makes Kindle format books readable on that hip little device; bless with a patent infringement lawsuit by Discovery Channel over some copy projection system in the Kindle; now see Sony do a deal with Google to make half a million free books available to owners of Sony's stylish reader ….

I'm not going to write the paper book's obituary, but it feels like, as one writer put it yesterday, e-readers/e-books/whatever-you-call-em are poised to become the iPod of the literary world very soon.

It feels like a classic format/standards war is about to break out. Sony is the master of dumb moves when it comes to copy protection and file formats. Anyone who bought one of their post-Walkman music players knows they had an approach to DRM that was right out from behind the Iron Curtain – what one would expect from a content company that also makes devices. Amazon, who gets credit in music for pushing DRM-free tunes before Apple did the same, is not a veteran of the format wars. You want someone who has gone to the mat at Microsoft, Adobe, etc. when you arrive at a file-format fight. Google knows formats and open systems better than anybody, so my perfect world would be this:

  1. The Kindle file format extends to all new devices with no royalties back to Amazon.
  2. Sony ends the division and signs onto the Kindle format as well.
  3. Google makes its content device-agnostic (which it should given its waltz with the publishers)
  4. Amazon discounts the heck out of the Kindle on a spring promo and gets it down to $100 – I know lots of non-techie people who are NOT early adopters who want a Kindle bad but have no way to justify $350 in this market. Indeed, coupon zealots like me and let us throw the discounts to the people we want to share books with.

3 responses so far

Mar 18 2009

Craig Merrigan is blogging

Published by under General

Colleague Craig Merrigan, VP of Consumer Marketing at Lenovo, has lit up a WordPress blog. This guy is interesting for a couple reasons. First, he has that classic consumer packaged goods background (Quaker Oats) that is tantamount to being a paratrooper in marketing circles (P&G, etc.). Second, he is one of the biggest risk takers I've met in any industry, and was, on several occasions, a partner in crime on some interesting ideas -- some of which saw the light of days, others which died a deserved death.

Craig is an interesting guy. Has a Japanese garden in his Chapel Hill backyard. Get him going on competitive rope jumping and watch what happens.

Here's his blog.

2 responses so far

Mar 18 2009

Citations for dune sex drop in ’08

Published by under Cape Cod

CapeCodTimes.com - Citations for dune sex drop in '08.

Cmon people. You're slacking off. We've got to make our quota.

2 responses so far

Mar 16 2009

Clam rake tussle leads to charges

Published by under Clamming

via Friendship - Clam rake tussle leads to charges - Government - VillageSoup.

Nothing like a clam rake fight to start off the spring clamming season.  Here in Barnstable the KlamKops pack guns. Now I know why.  Up in Friendship, Maine.....:

"Around 1 p.m. on March 7, Shellfish Warden Neil Pollis saw two men digging clams off Cushing Road. He approached the men to issue a shellfish violation for digging without a license.

The two men became agitated and a 17-year-old male circled Pollis with a clam rake, while Jason Olsen, 24, of Friendship threatened Pollis with a clam rake. Olsen and Pollis got into a struggle and during the altercation Pollis was hit with the clam rake, according to Knox County Sheriff's Deputy John Palmer. Pollis, who said he received some puncture wounds on the arm, was not seriously injured and was not transported to the hospital.

Pollis also had issued Olsen a violation about a week prior to the incident, he said. In addition, he had warned him on shellfish violations on other occasions."

Tip o' the hat to Cousin Tom in Damariscotta for the clip.

3 responses so far

Mar 16 2009

Digital Agency Report Cards 2008: Adweek

via Digital Agency Report Cards 2008.

My Google Alert sent in the annual rankings by AdWeek of the various agencies. Lenovo's agency of record is Ogilvy. I'm happy to see Lenovo was cited as a high point in their 2008 ranking.

"OgilvyInteractive is trying to figure out social media. It's established some bona fides. For Lenovo, it showed benefits of electronics giant's products by putting them in the hands of athletes at the Summer Olympics to blog for a Lenovo site. The "Voices of the Olympic Games" program generated 1,500 postings by 100 athletes. But, social media can bite back."

Couple things to clarify. OgilvyPR's 360 Digital Influence Project - Rohit Bhargava, Kaitlyn Wilkins, John Bell -- did the heavy lifting with blogger recruitment and management during the Olympics. Neo@Ogilvy - Nicole Estebanell's team -- led the media selection and execution of in-market dollars.

The project was conceived on the client side by me, executed by Lenovo's Alan White, Esteban Panzeri and Tim Supples and supported by Lenovo's comms team, especially Bob Page.  Ogilvy did a magnificent job rallying around us under impossible deadlines to make this program happy. Sidenote: the Voices project was a finalist in PRWeek's annual awards for best use of digital, but alas, lost out to an Ikea and milk moustache campaign

4 responses so far

Mar 16 2009

Whereabouts week of 3.16

Published by under General

Monday-Sunday 3.16-3.22:  Cotuit

I still look like a rabid raccoon had relations with Deputy Dawg and spawned a sniffling, red-nosed hulking man of nasal sadness who looked like he got stomped hard by a gang of old ladies and now sports two black eyes. I was toiling in the yard with a rake yesterday, deluded with thoughts of spring, my back to the sidewalk, when some cheery iPod-occluded power walker with hand weights and a perky pony tail wagging out of the back of her pink Red Sox cap yelled out a hearty "HI!" which nearly caused me to assault her with the rake.

"$%&*#!" I said neighbor-like. "You $%%#@ freaked me out!"

"Don't wantagiveyanotherblackeye" she giggled.

I need to get on the water for some sculling this week. Two rules apply for the first row of the season -1) there must be snow somewhere on the ground and I saw a good, grey snow drift near the launching ramp yesterday - 2) it has to occur on, or near St. Pat's which is tomorrow.

Next week: NYC for a two day expedition. China at the end of the month.

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